Why public art?

Art in a the public space for me purifies the energy, helps to share stories, ads substance. 

We spoke with some artists that create works for the community to get there perspective on public art.

Bec: MIke Watt Your work has recently been picked up by local councils in Sydney - why do you think they see this as an important part of there role now? or.... why do you think its important for the council to foster art in community spaces?

Mike: I think it's great that public art is being pushed more in Sydney. I think a one reason is that they see it as a way to stop tags. But I think the important reason for it, and also the reason they do it, is to bring colour and life to otherwise dull spots.

Picture sourced from the Daily Telegraph

Picture sourced from the Daily Telegraph

MIke: Stephen Powers recently painted a mural in Bondi Junction, it was in a fairly lifeless spot in the Oxford Street Mall, you normally just go there when you have to. Now whenever I get the chance I walk passed it to have another look, that mural makes me so happy and it's made the whole area around it that much more interesting. I think that public art can really create happiness and bring personality to what would otherwise be a boring wall.

Stephen Powers Bondi Wall ... Picture sourced from Aud Writes

Stephen Powers Bondi Wall ... Picture sourced from Aud Writes

Bec: Chris Nixon you have been pushing your work through a variety of mediums in the public space, can you share a story from one of your favourite projects?

Nixon: I guess the most technically challenging project was the projection mapping installation I installed with Sam Price at Scitech in West Australia. I was involved as the art director, illustrator and designer of the project coming up with the style, assets and storytelling component through detailed storyboarding and motion design to direct how everything would come together in the end. It was a HUGE project with all the components to piece together and by far the most technical I'd ever worked being a small two man team to work everything out ourselves. What resulted was a scramble to the finish having to farm out our insanely large files to render farms in Poland then uploaded back to project back onto the structure to give the illusion that the house really was being built up and torn down. We got the final files a few hours before we had to launch, so it was definitely a stressful time and some worthy lessons learnt. The end result though, was everything we imagined and the client couldn't have been happier.

In the end the most satisfying part was to see kids reacting to the work and believing the illusion.